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Can I Recycle That?

The Ultimate Guide to Recycling Everything

Have you ever found yourself wondering what items around your home can actually be recycled, and what can’t? Well, we’ve got you covered. Using this handy guide you’ll be able to find out if your home items are actually recyclable in your home recycling or if they need to be taken to a recycling centre for special recycling.

Recycling Statistics & Facts

While many of us make a conscious effort to ensure we recycle as much and as often as possible, it’s not enough. While recycling rates within the UK are increasing, so is our pollution. In order to meet demands, we’re producing more goods and using more natural resources than ever before, however despite this, we’re still throwing too many things away.

In order to really put this into perspective, we’ve collected some of the most shocking recycling statistics to highlight the problem of how much we’re throwing away.

Recycling

  • Within the last century, the UK has only increased the amount we recycled by 3%.
  • Recycling aluminium drink cans saves up to 95% of the energy required to make one from raw materials or power a TV for up to three hours.
  • Recycling a single plastic bottle can conserve enough energy to light a 60W light bulb for up to 6 hours.
  • 75% of the aluminium ever made is still in productive use today.
  • Every tonne of recycled steel saves 0.97 tonnes of CO2.
  • For every tonne of steel that is recycled, approximately 1.13 tonnes of iron ore, 0.6 tonnes of coal and 54kg of limestone are reserved.
  • A pair of jeans could contain an average of 8 recycled plastic bottles.
  • Brits spend nearly £5M on batteries per week, yet 98% of them are not recycled and end up in landfills.
  • In just one year, between April 2019 and March 2020, nearly 260 fires were started by ‘zombie’ batteries in recycling or waste management facilities within the UK.
  • Every car can be recycled, with up to 80% of materials being reused.
  • Recycling just one tonne of aluminium saves up to 9 tonnes of CO2 emissions.

Waste

  • A report released by the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) earlier this year revealed that British households create more than 26M tonnes of waste each year, the weight of roughly 260 large cruise ships.
  • On average, each person in the UK throws away roughly 400kg of waste per year – roughly 7 times their body weight.
  • Over 20,000 tonnes of batteries are sent to landfill sites in the UK each year. It takes 50 times more energy to make a battery than they give out in their lifetime.
  • Each year we throw away 600 million batteries.
  • Brits spend nearly £5M on batteries per week, yet 98% of them are not recycled and end up in landfills.
  • The average UK family throws away 6 trees worth of paper every year.
  • You could drive a car 11 metres on the oil it takes to make 1 plastic bag. 
  • Using the oil it takes to create the 13 billion plastic bags used by the UK every year, you could drive a car 143,000,000,000 metres – 3,568 times around the world.

How are Things Recycled?

For many of us, it’s as simple as ensuring you place rubbish is placed in the correct bins and put out on collection day. However, for those who work within the recycling industry recycling isn’t quite as simple. Materials that are wrongly placed in recycling require removal by hand and if missed can cause costly damage to machinery and equipment used within the recycling process.

How is Recycling Collected?

Across the UK there are a number of different recycling services offered which tend to vary slightly depending on certain factors that influence the services such as;

Generally, there are three recycling scheme types:

Kerbside Sort

Kerbside sort schemes collect and sort your recyclables into their respective materials on the lorry at the kerbside.

Two-Stream

Two-stream schemes are where paper and cards are collected in one compartment and the containers (cans, plastic bottles and glass bottles) are collected in another compartment.

Co-Mingled

Co-mingled collection schemes are where all your recyclables are put into one compartment on the lorry before being taken to a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and sorted.

What happens at recycling centres?

Across the UK, recyclable items are predominantly collected from your home in two ways, either ‘kerbside sort’ or ‘co-mingled’ collection. Kerbside sort collections automatically sort the materials and so unlike co-mingled collections don’t require being taken to Materials Recovery Facilities. Once materials from co-mingled collections arrive at MRFs, all the mixed recycling is sorted and separated by hand and/or machine before being sent to manufacturers who make it into new products.

The Seperation Process

  • Your recycling is collected and loaded into a collection vehicle.
  • Co-mingled materials are taken to Material Recovery Facilities across the country and the materials are loaded onto a conveyor.
  • The sorting process begins with the removal of incorrect items such as crisp packets and plastic bags.
  • A vibrating machine is then used to separate cardboard and paper – different types of paper are sorted by hand and then baled.
  • The remaining recyclables continue on another conveyor where steel cans are removed using magnets.
  • Different types of plastic are identified and separated using optical scanners.
  • A special kind of magnet called an eddy current is used to sort aluminium cans.
  • Glass is the remaining material and is allowed to drop off the end of the conveyor into a large container.

NOTE: Not all MRFs accept glass.

Once sorted, recycled materials become a valuable commodity within the worldwide market. There are a wide range of recycling factories here, reprocessing millions of tonnes of materials every year.

Problems & Issues

One of the biggest problems faced is when incorrect items are put into the wrong recycling containers because they then need to be removed by hand. This subsequently slows down the process and if these items are missed it can clog or even damage machinery and other equipment used during the recycling process. This is why it’s important to ensure you separate household recycling and know how to recycle common household goods.

Recycling Symbols Explained

Below you can find some of the most common recycling symbols found on packaging sold throughout the UK.

Remember: Not all packaging will have a recycling label but this doesn’t mean you can’t recycle it.

Recycle

Label applied to packaging that is collected by 75% or more of local UK authorities across the UK – E.G. Plastic Bottles.

Don't Recycle

Label applied to packaging that is collected by less than 50% of UK local authorities and/or is not able to be sorted, processed, and recycled.

Recycle | Rinse

Rinsing packaging, e.g. food trays, ensure that any food residue doesn’t contaminate other materials especially if collected together with paper.

Recycle | Rinse | Lid/Cap On

Caps and lids under 40MM in diameter are too small to be captured for recycling. This label means lids and caps should be left on the bottle to ensure they can be captured and recycled with the main packaging.

Don’t Recycle | Remove Sleeve/Film

This symbol is often found on packaging that contains a film or liner that can be removed via a strip without the need for a knife or scissors. There should be clear instructions on how to do so, e.g. “Peel Here”

Flatten | Cap On

Flattening packaging that contains this symbol such as beverage cartons and bottles and then replacing the cap, makes handling and transport more efficient.

Recycle with Bags at Large Supermarkets | Don’t Recycle at Home

If you see this symbol on plastic packaging and wrapping such as bread bags etc. You can recycle this packaging at plastic carrier bag recycling points in large supermarkets.

Paper, Card & Wood

The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) logo identifies wood-based products from well-managed forests independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC.

The Green Dot

Doesn’t necessarily mean packaging is recyclable, will be recycled or has been recycled. It is a symbol used on packaging in some European countries and signifies that the producer has made a financial contribution toward the recovery and recycling of packaging in Europe.

Mobius Loop

Indicates an object is capable of being recycled, not that the object has been recycled or will be accepted in all recycling collection systems. Sometimes this symbol is used with a percentage figure in the middle to explain that the packaging contains % of recycled materials.

Plastic Resin Codes

These symbols identify the type of resin used to make the item by providing a “Resin Identification Code”. It is represented with a ‘chasing arrows’ symbol surrounding a number between 1 and 7 that defines the resin used.

Glass

This symbol asks you to recycle glass containers. Dispose of glass jars and containers in a bottle bank, remember to separate colours, or use our glass household recycling collection if you have one.

Recyclable Aluminium

This symbol indicates that the item is made from recyclable aluminium.

Recyclable Steel

This symbol signifies the item is made from steel. All local authorities collect steel cans for recycling. Other steel or metal items can be taken to your household recycling centre.

Tidyman

This symbol is from Keep Britain Tidy and is used to remind you to dispose of litter. It doesn’t relate to recycling but is a reminder to be a good citizen, disposing of items in the appropriate way.

Waste Electricals

This symbol means that you should not place the electrical item in your general household waste. Electrical items can be recycled through a number of channels.

Compostable

Products certified to be industrially compostable according to European standard EN 13432/14955 may bear the ‘seedling’ logo. Never place compostable plastics into the recycling with other plastics; it is designed to break down and so cannot be recycled and contaminates recyclable plastics. Plastics carrying this symbol can be recycled with your garden waste through your local authority.

Home Composting

In addition to the seedling symbol for industrial composting, you may notice this one which means the item is suitable to be home composted.

Can I Recycle This Item?

Find out what materials are and are not suitable for recycling with this simple guide. This list is constantly being updated with new household items and regular-use items.

*It’s worth us mentioning that the advice below is general advice and you should always check your local council’s regulations and rules on how certain items should be recycled as some areas have slightly different rules.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Aerosols – Aerosol cans can be recycled in your mixed recycling bin at home. Remove plastic lids and put these in general waste. Ensure the aerosols are empty before recycling.

Aluminium Cans – Aluminium cans can be recycled in your mixed recycling bin at home.

Aluminium Foil – Recycle aluminium foil in your mixed recycling bin at home.

Asbestos – Household asbestos can be taken to a waste transfer facility. Asbestos should be double wrapped in heavy-duty plastic wrapping or household rubble sacks.

If you hired someone to remove asbestos, they would be required to dispose of it according to HSE guidelines themselves and cannot be taken to a waste transfer facility.

Ashes – Cold ashes (from wood or coal) can be added to your general waste bin. Ensure the ashes are cold.

B

Barbeques – Cold ashes from your BBQ can go in your general waste bin. Disposable BBQs can also be placed in your general waste bin once cooled.

Batteries – Batteries can be taken to dedicated battery recycling points found within supermarkets or taken to a recycling centre. NEVER throw batteries in your general household waste as this can cause a fire.

Beds – Beds can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Bikes – Consider donating your old bike if still in working order. If you wish to recycle your bike you can take it to a local recycling centre.

Blankets – Depending on the condition, you can donate blankets to charity shops. Animal shelters and charities will also sometimes take blankets as donations. If you don’t want to donate, you can recycle blankets at your local recycling centre.

Books – Pass your books on or consider donating them. You can also take books that are in good condition to your local recycling centre where they should be placed in the ‘media bank’. If the books are beyond useable, you can recycle them in your paper and card bin at home.

Bras – You can donate bras to some charities like “Small for All”, who will take gently used bras for recycling and donation, as will some lingerie retailers. You can also recycle bras in clothing and textile containers at local recycling centres.

Bric-a-Brac – You can donate bric-a-brac at various charity shops. Depending on the item you can recycle bric-a-brac in your general waste bin or take them to your local recycling centre.

Building Materials – Materials from DIY projects can be recycled at your local recycling centre. Building materials from tradespeople or builders are classed as business waste and can’t be taken to local recycling centres.

C

CDs – CDs can be donated to local charity shops. Damaged or incomplete discs can go in your general waste bin at home.

Car Batteries – Car batteries should be taken to a local recycling centre for recycling.

Cardboard – Empty card packaging like cereal boxes can be recycled in your paper and card bin at home. Flatten cardboard packaging to save space

Carpet – Carpets can be taken to your local recycling centre for recycling. Any waste from builders cannot be taken to a recycling centre.

Carrier Bags (Plastic) – Plastic carrier bags can be recycled at some supermarket plastic bag recycling points (some accept other types of plastic too). If there are no recycling points, plastic carrier bags can go in your general waste bin at home.

Cat Litter – Cat litter should be disposed of in your general waste bin at home.

Chairs – If still useable, you can likely donate your chairs to a charity. Otherwise, chairs can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Christmas Decorations – Most glass and plastic baubles along with tinsel are not recyclable and should be placed in your general waste bin. Wreaths are usually made of natural materials and can be composted in your garden waste bin as long as they don’t contain glitter.

Christmas Tree (Real) – Real Christmas trees can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Christmas Tree (Artificial) – Artificial Christmas trees can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Clinical Waste – Blood, syringes and human/animal tissue are classified as clinical waste. Do not dispose of clinical waste in bins or recycling centres. Speak to a GP or medical practice about how to dispose of clinical waste.

Clothes – Clothes in good condition can be donated to a charity shop. Clothes in any condition can be taken to your local recycling centre.

Coins – Foreign coins and old British coins can be taken to charity shops or banks for collection.

Computers – Computers should be recycled at your local recycling centre. Consider donating your old computer if still in working or fixable order.

Cooking Oil – You can take cooking oil to your local recycling centre. Cooled cooking oil should be placed in an empty disposable sealed container. Alternatively, you can put cooking oil in your general waste bin so long as it’s contained within a sealed bottle.

Curtains – If still in good condition, curtains can be donated to charity shops. If their condition isn’t great, you can recycle curtains at your local recycling centre or at clothing and textile banks at supermarkets.

D

DIY Waste – DIY waste can be taken to your local recycling centre for recycling. Builders cannot take DIY waste to local recycling centres.

DVDs – DVDs can be donated to local charity shops. Damaged or incomplete discs can go in your general waste bin at home.

Dishwasher – You can donate old dishwashers provided they still work. If it doesn’t work, you should recycle it at your local recycling centre.

Disposable Cutlery – Disposable cutlery cannot be recycled if it’s made of plastic as it is usually too small. Wooden cutlery can be recycled in your garden waste bins.

Dog Waste – Any and all dog waste should be disposed of in your general waste bin at home.

Drinking Glasses – Broken drinking glasses should be wrapped up and disposed of in general waste bins. You can donate good condition drinking glasses to charity shops. Drinking glasses and wine glasses cannot be recycled in your mixed recycling bin.

Drinks Bottles – Drinks bottles should be recycled in your mixed recycling bin at home. Other bottles such as shampoo bottles, spray bottles and more should also go in this bin.

E

Egg Shells – Egg shells should be placed in your garden waste bin at home.

Electrical Items – Electrical items should be recycled at your local recycling center. These items should never be thrown into general waste bins as they can cause fires.

Engine Oil – Engine oil can be taken to a local recycling center. It should be in a sealed container where it cannot leak.

Envelopes – Envelopes can be recycled in your paper and card bin (even those with a window).

F

Fabric – Fabrics in good condition can be donated. Those in poor condition can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Face Masks – Non-reusable face masks should be thrown into your general waste bins at home once they are no longer of use.

Fat – Fat can be taken to your local recycling centre. Cooled fat should be stored in an empty, disposable sealed container. Alternatively, you can put fat in your general waste bin so long as it’s contained within a sealed bottle.

Fireworks – Soak used fireworks in water and wrap in a plastic bag before disposal. They should be placed in your general waste bin or taken to a local recycling centre.

Fluorescent Tubes – Fluorescent tubes should be taken to your local recycling centre. Do not put them in your mixed recycling bin.

Foil – Clean aluminum foil and foil trays can be recycled in your mixed recycling bin at home. This doesn’t include foil-wrapped crisp packets or pet food pouches as these are often metallised plastic films.

Food Waste – Food waste should be placed in your kitchen caddy or garden waste bins

Fridge / Freezer – You can donate old fridges and freezers provided they still work. If it doesn’t work, you should recycle it at your local recycling centre.

G

Garden Chemicals – Check if your local recycling centre takes hazardous materials – some accept certain types of hazardous chemicals. Never put chemicals in your general waste bin.

Garden Waste – Garden waste should be recycled in your garden waste bin at home – garden waste includes leaves, hedge clippings, twigs, and more.

Gas Bottles – Gas bottles should be taken to your local recycling center for recycling if you are done with them. Often gas bottles can be refilled and reused. Never put gas bottles in general waste bins.

General Waste – General waste should always be placed in your general waste bin at home – general waste includes plastic pots and tubs, plastic bags, pet waste, wet wipes, and more.

Glass – Flat glass (crockery or window glass) can’t be recycled in your mixed recycling bin or in glass recycling bins. The flat glass should be taken to your local recycling center.

H

Hair Dryer – Hair dryers can be donated if still in working order. If not, they can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Hardcore & Rubble – Hardcore and rubble can be recycled at your local recycling center – hardcore and rubble include, bricks, cement, clay, concrete and more. Builders’ waste cannot be taken to local recycling centers.

Hazardous Waste – Some hazardous waste from your home can be recycled at local recycling centers such as TVs, fridges, engine oil and lead-acid batteries. These hazardous materials should all be separated. 

Hearing Aids – Hearing aids that make use of batteries or are rechargeable should be recycled at a local recycling center

I

Inhalers – Old inhalers should be taken to your local pharmacy for disposal. Don’t put these in your general waste bins.

Ink Cartridge – Ink cartridges and toner cartridges can be recycled at a local recycling center. There are also businesses like our own that will pay you for old printer cartridges. Sell yours Today →

Iron – Old appliances can be donated. If this isn’t possible, they can be recycled at your local recycling center. These items should never be placed in your general waste bin.

J

Jewellery – Jewellery, and watches are usually accepted by charity shops and generally aren’t recycled, instead, they are just sold. Some organisations will also take old jewellery for recycling.

K

Keg – Old beer kegs can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Kettle – If it still works consider donating the item. If not, you can recycle them at your local recycling centre. These types of items should never be placed in your general waste bins.

Keys – Old metal keys can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Kitchen Foil – Clean kitchen foil and foil trays can be placed in your mixed recycling bin. Crisp packets and pet food pouches should not be included as these aren’t actually foil.

L

Lamps – As with many other electrical items, lamps can be taken to your local recycling centre. Do not put these items in your general waste bins.

Laptop – If in working order, consider donating your laptop. If not, laptops can be recycled at your local recycling centre. They should never be placed in your general waste bins as they can cause fires. Also, ensure you remove personal files and data from the laptop.

Large Electrical Items – Large electrical items should be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Lateral Flow Tests – Safely dispose of lateral flow tests by placing all of the items from the test and plastic packaging into a bag and then in your general waste bin. This applies whether the test is positive or negative. None of the items or packaging should be placed in your recycling bins.

Lawnmower – Electric lawnmowers can be taken to your local recycling centre for disposal. Petrol lawnmowers can be recycled with scrap metal at your local recycling centre.

Light Bulb – Incandescent lightbulbs cannot be recycled and should be placed in your general waste bin. Energy-saving LED light bulbs can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

M

Magazines – Magazines can be recycled in your paper and card bin at home. Ensure you remove all plastic wrapping.

Mattress – Used mattresses can be recycled at select recycling centres. If you can’t transport the mattress, the council will usually collect it for you.

Medicine – Medicine and tablets are considered hazardous waste and can’t be placed in general waste bins. Check with your local pharmacy if you have leftover medicine as they’ll often take this back for disposal. Empty medicine packaging can go in your general waste bin. Glass and plastic bottles should go in your mixed recycling bin.

Metal Tubing – Metal tubes should be recycled in your general waste bin. This includes tomato puree tubes, sauce tubes, beauty tubes, etc.

Microwave – Electricals like your microwave can be donated if still in working order. If not, they can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Milk Bottles – Plastic and glass milk bottles can be placed in your mixed recycling bin for recycling. Remove lids from plastic bottles beforehand as these cannot be recycled.

Mirrors – Broken mirrors can be taken to local recycling centres for recycling, and should not be placed in any of your recycling bins. Mirrors that aren’t broken can be donated to charity shops.

Mobile Phones – Mobile phones can be donated provided they still work. If they don’t work, you can recycle your old phone at a local recycling centre. Do not put mobile phones in general waste bins as they can cause fires.

N

Nappies – Disposable nappies and sanitary products cannot be recycled and should be placed in your general waste bin

Needles – Needles and syringes should be disposed of as per the supplier’s instructions – this is usually by sealing them in a container. Check with your local council for safe disposal schemes. Never put needles in your general waste or recycling bins and don’t take them to recycling centres.

Newspaper – Newspaper should be placed in your paper and card bins for recycling. Remove any plastic wrapping first.

O

Oil – Engine oil can be taken to a local recycling centre. It should be in a sealed container where it cannot leak.

Oven – if in working order, consider donating your oven. If not, you can recycle your oven at your local recycling centre or arrange a collection via your local council.

P

Paint & Paint Cans – You can take unused paint to a local reuse scheme where they will take it off your hands. The paint cans can then be recycled at your local recycling centre. Do not put paint tins in your mixed recycling bin and paint must never be poured down drains.

Paper – Paper should be recycled in your paper and card bin. Paper with glitter, foil or plastic coatings cannot be recycled.

Pet Bedding – Pet bedding for domestic pets like rabbits, hamsters etc. can be recycled via your garden waste bin. Hay, sawdust, straw, wood chippings and chipped wood are classified as pet bedding suitable for garden waste recycling.

Pet Food – Pet food can be recycled at home and should be placed in your food and garden waste bin.

Pet Waste – Pet waste like dog and cat poo should be bagged and placed in your general waste bins.

Petrol – Petrol can be taken to your local recycling centre for recycling. It should be kept in a sealed container. You will not be able to take your container home.

Photographs – Photographs and negatives can be disposed of in your general waste bins at home. Most photo paper is coated in a thin layer of plastic and cannot be recycled in your paper and card bin.

PillowsCharities and animal shelters may sometimes take donated pillows.

Pizza Boxes – Empty pizza boxes can be recycled in your paper and card bin at home even when stained and greasy. Throw any leftover pizza in your garden and food waste bin.

Plasterboard – If you have removed plasterboards within your home you dispose of them via your local recycling centre.

Plastic Bags – Some local supermarkets have a plastic bag recycling point you can take your bags to. If you can’t reuse or recycle your plastic bag then you can dispose of them in your general waste bin.

Plastic Bottles – Plastic bottles can be recycled in your mixed recycling bin. This includes all types of bottles like cleaning products, spray bottles and more.

Plastic Film – Plastic film should be placed in your general waste bin. This includes items like film and plastic wrapping.

Polystyrene – Polystyrene should be disposed of in your general waste bin. This includes polystyrene cups, plates, trays and more.

Pots & Pans – Pots and pans can be taken to your local recycling centre for recycling. If they are still usable, you can donate them.

Printer – Like many electricals, printers can be taken to your local recycling centre. If still in working order you can also donate your printer to a charity shop.

Printer Cartridges – Printer ink cartridges and toner cartridges can be recycled at a local recycling centre. There are also businesses like our own that will pay you for old printer cartridges. Sell yours Today →

Pyrex Glass – You can’t recycle broken or chipped Pyrex glass in your mixed recycling bin. Ensure this is placed in your general waste bin.

Q

Quilt – Quilts are not recyclable. Some charity shops will allow you to donate them as will some animal shelters. Otherwise, they should be placed in your general waste bin.

R

Radios – Radios can be taken to a local recycling centre for recycling. If still in working order consider donating.

Raw Meat & Fish (Inc Bones) – Raw or cooked meat and fish (including the bones) can be recycled in your food and garden waste bins. Food waste cannot be recycled at local recycling centres.

Records – You can’t recycle vinyl records in your mixed recycling bin. These should instead be placed in your general waste bin or at a local recycling centre.

Rubble – Rubble can be recycled at your local recycling centre – bricks, cement, clay, concrete and more are considered rubble. Builders waste cannot be taken to local recycling centres.

Rugs – Rugs can be recycled at your local recycling centre – if in good condition you may consider donating your rug to charity.

S

Sat Nav – Sat navs are recyclable if taken to a local recycling centre.

Scrap Metal – You can take scrap metal to your local recycling centre. Scrap metal should not be put in any of your bins at home.

Shampoo Bottles – Shampoo bottles can be placed in your mixed recycling bins along with plastic bottles and spray bottles.

Shoes – Charity shops will accept shoes as donations provided they’re in good condition. If they are too old and worn they can be placed in your general waste. bins

Smoke Alarm – Some local authorities will collect small electricals. Otherwise you can recycle these at a local recycling centre.

Soil – Garden soil can be taken to your local recycling centre. It should not be placed in your food and garden waste bins as this can affect the quality of the compost produced.

Storage Heater – You can take storage heaters to your local recycling centre. Check if your storage heater has an asbestos brick inside before recycling.

Straws – Plastic straws should be disposed of in your general waste bin at home.

Sun Bed – You can take sun beds to a recycling centre. It must be dismantled before arriving at the recycling centre with the fluorescent tubes removed.

T

Tablet Computer – As with many other types of electricals, tablet computers can be donated if still in working order or recycled at your local recycling centre.

Teabags – Teabags and coffee grounds can be disposed of in your garden and food waste bins. Coffee ground filters should be disposed of in your general waste bin.

Textiles – Textiles that are in good condition can be donated to charity shops. Those that aren’t in good condition can be recycled at your local recycling centre.

Thermometer – Thermometers can be recycled at your local recycling centre despite containing mercury.

Tiles (Wall & Floor) – Tiles from DIY projects can be taken and recycled at your local recycling centre as long as you carried out the work yourself. You are limited to the amount of rubble you can take in one visit.

Timber & Wood – Wood and timber can be taken to your local recycling centre in order to be recycled.

Toaster – Electricals can be disposed of at your local recycling centre. If still in working order, consider donating your electrical items instead of recycling them.

Toner Cartridge – Toner cartridges can be recycled at a local recycling centre. There are also businesses like our own that will pay you for old printer cartridges. Sell yours today →

Tools – Unwanted tools can be recycled at your local recycling centre. You can also donate tools to certain charities for refurbishment.

Towels – Recycling centres don’t accept towels for recycling. Some pet and animal charities will accept them as donations.

Toys & Games – Many toys and games can’t be recycled as they’re made from plastics. Consider donating your old toys and games to charity shops.

TV & Monitors – Consider donating your TV/monitor if it still works. Many local recycling centres will accept TV’s and monitors. Never put electrical items in your general waste bin as this can cause fires.

Tyres – Tyres can be recycled at some local recycling centres where they’re shredded.

U

Underwear – Unwanted underwear can be recycled using local recycling containers found at supermarkets and local recycling centres.

V

Vegetable Oil – Vegetable oil can be taken to your local recycling centre for recycling. Ensure it is cooled and stored in a sealed container before recycling. You can also put vegetable oil in a plastic bottle and in your general waste bin.

Video Tapes – Some charity shops will accept old video tapes that are still in good condition. You can put them in your general waste bin.

W

Wallpaper – Wallpaper cannot be recycled in your paper and card bin. Ensure you place new or used wallpaper in your general waste bin. Some charity shops will also accept unused wallpaper.

Washing Machine – If still in working order, consider donating to a charity shop. Washing machines and dryers can be taken to your local recycling centre. Some councils will also collect bulky items for recycling.

Watch – Some charity shops and organisations will allow you to donate watches and jewellery (including broken).

Water Filter – Water filters should be disposed of in your general waste bin unless you have a recycling scheme

Wet Wipes – Wet wipes should be disposed of in your general waste bin. Never flush wet wipes down the toilet.

Windows – You can take windows (including uPVC windows) you have removed from your home to a local recycling centre. If possible, remove the glass from the frame. Glass, wood and plastic from windows should be separated and recycled separately if possible.

Wine Bottles – Glass wine bottles can be recycled in your mixed recycling bin at home. Rinse bottles and place lids in your general waste bin.

Wool – Wool can be donated to local charity shops, schools or community groups.

Wrapping Paper – Some wrapping paper is accepted in your paper and card bin. Ensure you remove any tape before recycling.

Y

Yoghurt Pots – Plastic yoghurt pots should be placed in your general waste bin.

Z

Ziplock Bags – Ziplock bags cannot be recycled and should go in your general waste bins.